Author Archives: Amy Matychuk

About Amy Matychuk

Amy Matychuk is a 2018 Juris Doctor candidate at the University of Calgary. Amy received a Bachelor of Arts (English Literature) from Ambrose University College. She is currently a research assistant for Professor Nigel Bankes (the Chair of Natural Resources Law), where she briefs and records trends in decisions of the Alberta Energy Regulator. Amy will be clerking for the Provincial Court of Alberta starting in June 2018.

The Alberta Energy Regulator Grants Rare Participation Rights to Three Indigenous Groups

By: Amy Matychuk PDF Version: The Alberta Energy Regulator Grants Rare Participation Rights to Three Indigenous Groups Decision Commented On: The Alberta Energy Regulator decision on participation in the hearing of Prosper Petroleum Ltd.’s Rigel Project, March 16 2017 On March … Continue reading

Posted in Aboriginal, Energy | Leave a comment

Announcing a New Resource for the Letter Decisions of the Alberta Energy Regulator

By: Nigel Bankes, Amy Matychuk, and David Rennie PDF Version: Announcing a New Resource for the Letter Decisions of the Alberta Energy Regulator Decisions Commented On: The Participatory/Procedural Decisions of the AER Several years ago now, ABlawg published a series of … Continue reading

Posted in Energy, Oil & Gas | Leave a comment

When the Burden of Proving Institutional Bias Rests on a Prisoner

By: Amy Matychuk PDF Version: When the Burden of Proving Institutional Bias Rests on a Prisoner Case Commented On: Canada v Ewert, 2016 FCA 203 (CanLII) Prisons use psychological tests to determine if inmates are likely to reoffend, but are the … Continue reading

Posted in Constitutional, Criminal | Leave a comment

Costs to the Respondent: Discouraging Habeas Corpus Applications

By: Amy Matychuk PDF Version: Costs to the Respondent: Discouraging Habeas Corpus Applications Case Commented On: Voisey v Canada (Attorney General), 2016 ABQB 316 (CanLII) In Voisey v Canada (Attorney General), 2016 ABQB 316, Justice Crighton of the Alberta Court of … Continue reading

Posted in Access to Justice, Administrative Law, Costs | Leave a comment