Author Archives: Alice Woolley

About Alice Woolley

LL.M. (Yale), LL.B. (Toronto), B.A. (Toronto). Professor. Member of the Alberta Bar. Associate Dean (Academic). Please click here for more information.

Access to Justice in Criminal Law

By: Alice Woolley PDF Version: Access to Justice in Criminal Law Case Commented On: R. v Moodie, 2016 ONSC 3469 (CanLII) The Charter of Rights and Freedoms guarantees everyone the right to retain and instruct counsel on arrest or detention. What … Continue reading

Posted in Access to Justice, Constitutional, Criminal | Leave a comment

A National Code of Conduct?

By: Alice Woolley PDF Version: A National Code of Conduct? Document Commented On: The Federation of Law Societies of Canada’s Model Code of Professional Conduct I like the Federation of Law Societies’ Model Code of Conduct. It’s not perfect.   But … Continue reading

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What Ought Crown Counsel to do in Prosecuting Sexual Assault Charges? Some Post-Ghomeshi Reflections

By: Alice Woolley PDF Version: What Ought Crown Counsel to do in Prosecuting Sexual Assault Charges? Some Post-Ghomeshi Reflections Case Commented On: R v Ghomeshi, 2016 ONCJ 155 The Ghomeshi trial made me think about the ethical duties of prosecutors … Continue reading

Posted in Criminal, Ethics and the Legal Profession, State Responses to Violence | 9 Comments

The Top Ten Canadian Legal Ethics Stories – 2015

By: Alice Woolley PDF Version: The Top Ten Canadian Legal Ethics Stories – 2015 Year’s end invites assessment of what has passed. For me, that includes reflection on the most significant developments in legal ethics over the year (Reflections from … Continue reading

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When Judicial Decisions Go from Wrong to Wrongful – How Should the Legal System Respond?

By: Alice Woolley PDF Version: When Judicial Decisions Go from Wrong to Wrongful – How Should the Legal System Respond? Case Commented On: R v Wagar, 2015 ABCA 327 (CanLII) Introduction Judges make wrong decisions. As I discussed in a … Continue reading

Posted in Criminal, State Responses to Violence | 1 Comment