Hibernia Payout Account Dispute

By: Nigel Bankes

PDF Version: Hibernia Payout Account Dispute

Case Commented On: Newfoundland and Labrador v ExxonMobil Canada Properties, 2017 NLDT(G) 147, 2017 CanLII 56724 (NL SCTD)

This case involves an unsuccessful application by the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador to set aside an arbitral award dealing with the calculation of royalties with respect to the Hibernia project. Continue reading

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Posted in Arbitration, Oil & Gas | Leave a comment

R v Keror: Police Duties, Accused Duties, and the Right to Counsel of Choice

By: Alexandra Heine

PDF Version: R v Keror: Police Duties, Accused Duties, and the Right to Counsel of Choice

Case Commented On: R v Keror, 2017 ABCA 273 (CanLII)

Introduction

Mr. Keror was accused of shooting and killing Philip Anny on September 30, 2012. A witness identified the accused as the shooter. He was arrested at 8:15 pm on October 1, 2012 by a member of the Calgary Police tactical team. At trial, the accused made an application to enter into a voir dire. He submitted that his s 10(b) rights under the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms were violated. Justice E. A. Hughes of the Alberta Court of Queen’s Bench found no s 10(b) breach (see R v Keror, 2015 ABQB 382 (CanLII)). A jury convicted Mr. Keror of second-degree murder. The accused then appealed this decision on five grounds. This commentary will focus strictly on grounds one through three. The first ground is as follows: Did the trial judge err by failing to consider whether there was a contextual or temporal link between any delay in facilitating access to counsel and the appellant’s subsequent statement the next day? The second and third grounds of appeal are as follows: did the police violate section 10(b) when they interviewed the appellant before he spoke with his counsel of choice?

At the Alberta Court of Appeal, Justices Marina Paperny, Barbara Lea Veldhuis and Jo’Anne Strekaf held that the Calgary Police did not violate the appellant’s right to consult with counsel of choice. Effectively, the peace officers complied with their duties under section 10(b) of the Charter. The first three grounds of appeal were dismissed on that basis. This decision gives us a glimpse into the struggle that our court system faces when assessing whether or not a person’s section 10(b) rights have been violated. Continue reading

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Posted in Constitutional, Criminal | Leave a comment

Apply … Deny … Repeat: A Victim of Crime Story

By: Shaun Fluker

PDF Version: Apply … Deny … Repeat: A Victim of Crime Story

Case Commented On: Johnson v Alberta Criminal Injuries Review Board, 2017 ABCA 281 (CanLII)

This decision caught my attention because it reminded me of the movie Edge of Tomorrow wherein the main character lives the same day over and over fighting and dying in a repetitive time loop. Johnson v Alberta Criminal Injuries Review Board concerns an application by Johnson for a financial award under the Victims of Crime Act, RSA 2000 c V-3 as compensation for an injury he sustained as the victim of a stabbing. His initial 2010 application for compensation has been considered in numerous administrative adjudications under the Act and judicial scrutiny, and this most recent decision by the Court of Appeal sends it back for yet one more consideration. It is an interesting glimpse into a repetitive loop formed within an administrative regime, and the case also demonstrates why judicial oversight over the exercise of statutory power is an essential component of our legal system. Continue reading

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Posted in Administrative Law | 1 Comment

An Operator of Gas Processing Facilities Does Not Have a Possessory Lien Under the Possessory Liens Act

By: Nigel Bankes

PDF Version: An Operator of Gas Processing Facilities Does Not Have a Possessory Lien Under the Possessory Liens Act

Case Commented On: Cansearch Resources Ltd v Regent Resources Ltd, 2017 ABQB 535 (CanLII)

Cansearch and Regent jointly owned the Joffre Facility under the term of an agreement for the construction, ownership and operation (CO & O) of that facility (2008). Cansearch was appointed as operator. The CO & O agreement afforded Cansearch as operator an operator’s lien (cl 602(a)) in the following terms:

Effective from the Effective Date, Operator shall have a lien and charge, which is first and prior to any other lien, charge, mortgage or other security interest, with respect to the Function Unit Participations of each Owner in the Facility and such Owner’s share of Facility Products, to secure payment of such Owner’s proportionate share of the costs and expenses incurred by Operator for the Joint Account.

Cansearch never registered its Operator’s Lien pursuant to the Personal Property Security Act, RSA 2000, c P-7 (PPSA). Continue reading

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Posted in Oil & Gas, Property | Leave a comment

Is Alberta’s Mental Health Act Sufficiently Protecting Patients?

By: Lorian Hardcastle

PDF Version: Is Alberta’s Mental Health Act Sufficiently Protecting Patients?

Case Commented On: JH v Alberta Health Services, 2017 ABQB 477 (CanLII)

At first blush, JH v Alberta Health Services does not seem to warrant much attention. It is an oral judgement relating to a procedural matter—whether a plaintiff can proceed with a moot claim. However, this case highlights several important issues in mental health law and its resolution could result in significant reforms to Alberta’s Mental Health Act, RSA 2000, c-13. The plaintiff, who was involuntarily detained and treated at Foothills Hospital for nine months, disputed his detention and challenged the constitutionality of several provisions of the Mental Health Act. He was diagnosed with a neuro-cognitive disorder and had also struggled with alcoholism and the physical injuries resulting from a car accident. Continue reading

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Posted in Constitutional, Health Law | 4 Comments